Newsagent

Contact us

Chat with us

Phone: 13 23 98 or (08)9224 6500
TTY: 08 9225 7831
(Hearing impaired only)
Appointment:Make a booking

Occupations

Occupation search

Newsagent

Back to top

Summary of occupation

Newsagents run stores that specialise in selling magazines, newspapers and other items such as stationery, confectionery and lottery tickets. Newsagents are the managers, and often also the owners of these stores, and they usually work either alone or with limited additional staff. They receive deliveries of newspapers and magazines, price goods, stock shelves, arrange displays, order stock and sell products to customers. They may also distribute magazines or newspapers to other businesses in their area, and may operate Australia Post services such as mail and parcel pick-up services. Some newsagents may also offer dry-cleaning, bill payment or ticketing services.

ANZSCO description:
Newsagents run stores that specialise in
 selling magazines, newspapers and other items such as stationery,
 confectionery and lottery tickets.
Alternative names:
Lotteries Agent
Specialisations:
Job prospects: Average 
Back to top

Knowledge, skills and attributes

A newsagent needs:

  • to enjoy serving customers
  • a helpful demeanour
  • organisational skills
  • strong maths and business skills
  • the ability to work long hours
Back to top

Working conditions

Newsagents work in newsagencies, serving customers in the store, and undertaking administrative and stocktaking duties in the office or storeroom. They usually work long hours, with many newsagencies opening early and closing late, and are usually also open on weekends. They are often required to stand for long periods. Newsagents work all over the state, from small news stand-style businesses in busy city locations, to larger, more comprehensive newsagents in country towns that offer a range of services to meet the needs of their community.

Back to top

Salary details

Retail managers, which include newsagents, can expect to earn between $492 and $937 per week, depending on their level of business and the demand for their stock and services.

*ABS Census (2006)

Back to top

Tools and technologies

Newsagents use cash registers, EFTPOS machines, and sometimes also credit card machines. They generally also use computers and data management software to keep track of their stock. They may be required to wear a uniform.

Back to top

Education and training/entrance requirements

There are no formal education of training requirements to become a newsagent. However, your chances of gaining employment may be improved if you have completed a certificate course in retail or retail management.

The Certificate II and Certificate III in Retail are available from a range of TAFE campuses across the state. These courses offer the practical skills and knowledge required to undertake a range of duties in a retail sales environment, and usually take one semester (six months) to complete.

The Certificate IV in Retail Management is available from a number of private Registered Training Organisations, and offers the skills and knowledge required to undertake a management role in the retail sales sector. The course length may vary depending on provider.

Traineeships are also available in Retail Operations and Retail Management.

As trainee, you enter into a formal training contract with an employer. You spend most of your time working and learning practical skills on the job and you spend some time undertaking structured training with a registered training provider. They will assess your skills and when you are competent in all areas, you will be awarded a nationally recognised qualification. Visit ApprentiCentre to find out more. Both Retail Operations and Retail Management traineeships take twelve months to complete.

If you are still at school

You can access a traineeship through your school. You generally start your school based traineeship by attending school three days a week, spending one day at a registered training organisation and one day at work.

Talk to your schoolʼs VET Coordinator to start your training now through VET in Schools.

If you get a full-time traineeship you can apply to leave school before reaching the school leaving age.

If you are no longer at school you can apply for a traineeship and get paid while you learn and work.

Related courses

Back to top

Apprenticeships and traineeships

As an apprentice or trainee, you enter into a formal training contract with an employer. You spend most of your time working and learning practical skills on the job and you spend some time undertaking structured training with a registered training provider of your choice. They will assess your skills and when you are competent in all areas, you will be awarded a nationally recognised qualification. Visit the ApprentiCentre to find out more.

If you are still at school you can access an apprenticeship through your school. You generally start your school based apprenticeship by attending school three days a week, spending one day at a registered training organisation and one day at work. Talk to your school's VET Co-ordinator to start your training now through VET in Schools. If you get a full-time apprenticeship you can apply to leave school before reaching the school leaving age.

If you are no longer at school you can apply for an apprenticeship or traineeship and get paid while you learn and work.

Related apprenticeships

Back to top

Recognition of prior learning

If you think you already have some of the skills or competencies, obtained either through non-formal or informal learning, you may be able to gain credit through recognition of prior learning.

Back to top

Download

Related links

Related occupations

Need advice?

Profile and social options